Visit to Franklin-Wilkins Library, Kings College London (Water Campus)


From the Maughan Library we went to Franklin-Wilkins Library at Waterloo Campus in the afternoon around 2:00 pm. On the way while crossing river Thames on the bridge, we saw the spectacular scenes of the London including London’s iconic world’s tallest giant wheel London Eye.  We met Veronyka Carson who briefly introduced us about the Waterloo campus library and its services. She then took us around the library and explained some of the important services offered by the library.

With Vimal Shah & Veronyka Carson

With Vimal Shah & Veronyka Carson

The Franklin-Wilkins Library is home to extensive management and education holdings. Significant biomedical, health and life sciences coverage includes nursing, midwifery, public health, gerontology, nutrition and dietetics, pharmacy, toxicology, biological and environmental sciences, biochemistry and forensic science.  Unlike the Maughan Library, this library is very modern in its look and infrastructure facilities. There are plenty of group study rooms available on booking. The library offer both color and B/W printing facilities. Follow Me Printing (FMP) allow the student to send a document to one of several designated ‘follow me’ printers located across the library. Web printing facility even allows students to print from home.  All students have ‘anytime anywhere’ access to online self paced courses from Microsoft IT Academy, available on intranet. The library follow zoning policy since 2011 and created variety of working environments to suit students needs.  There are mainly four zones namely Quiet Study, Silent Study, Group Study and Social Space.  In the Social Space, the students can eat cold food or use their mobile phone whilst they take a break from studying.  We also had one-to-one meeting with some of the staff. Mr. Guttenburg from the IT services explained about the IT support to the library as well as to the students. Mr. Vimal Shah, Information Specialist for Social Science and Public Policy gave us general and library brochures.  We had a lengthy discussion with him about the future plans of the library.  He said that one of the important areas they are presently working on is that of research data management.  They are currently working with colleagues in the Directorate of Research and Innovation to develop the King’s College London policy on research data management.  They recently launched a training course, Managing Your Research Data. This course looks at the management of research data throughout the project lifecycle – from project design to storage, preservation, re-use and archiving. It provides guidance on your legal responsibilities to keep data secure and covers data storage options, as well as advice on retention and disposal of records. The course includes practical exercises on best practice in data management planning.  Veronyka told us that they are doing away with all the print journals and only handful of journals left.  Another interesting area in the library is Pods which the Information Specialists use to have either one-to-one or group  discussions with the students.  There is as an area inside the library dedicated to students services related to their academic, administrative and international student services etc. This is the first time we have seen that the library housing the student general service area.

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Use of Pods for Discussion

Use of Pods for Discussion

Handful journals left in print format

Handful journals left in print format

Photos of the visit to Franklin-Wilkins Library  are available at Photo Gallery


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